Programs

Program Summary
Family Promise works with homeless families that include children. These family units have many shapes and sizes including single mothers, single fathers, two parent families, multi-generational families, and expectant parents. We are one of the few programs in Knoxville that can serve all family configurations. We believe that the best way to return families to sustainable independence is to keep the family unit intact to face the challenges of regaining housing and working toward a better life. By partnering with the interfaith community to provide shelter, meals, and volunteer support, Family Promise is designed to provide high quality programming at a fraction of the cost of traditional shelter programs.
Interfaith Hospitality Network (IHN)
Known as the Interfaith Hospitality Network (IHN), Family Promise partners with area congregations to meet the basic needs of children and parents who are homeless; safe, secure overnight shelter, a safe place to spend the day out of the elements, and wholesome consistent meals. IHN currently unites over 40 interfaith and community organizations. Their support is vital to the success of the Family Promise program. Host organizations open their facilities to provide shelter to families in need. For a week at a time, about once a quarter, each of these host sites converts classrooms into bedrooms for guests of the program. Support organizations provide volunteers to assist the hosts. Volunteers are the heart of the program. Without them, the Interfaith Hospitality Network would not exist. Volunteers cook and serve meals, play with children, help them with homework, and stay overnight. Most importantly, they are the human spirit of hospitality, personal support, and compassion that families need.
Family Promise of Knoxville Case Management
Family Promise operates a day center with a home-like environment for the families to spend the day, including space for parents to care for pre-school children, access laundry and shower facilities and search for housing and employment. More than just a place to spend the day, Family Promise provides intensive case management through its social work staff. Crucial life skills are taught and support provided. We work through a strength-based model. Identifying strengths and areas for improvement allows adults in the program to set and achieve goals. The multiple components of the Family Promise program are designed to work together to address the multiple and complex issues that contribute to family homelessness.
Family Promise Academy
The Family Promise Academy seeks to address the underlying causes of family homelessness and build self-reliance by teaching important life skills to both children and adults. Through collaborations with the University of Tennessee Agriculture Extension, and community
professionals, families attend key life-skill classes and workshops. Life skills classes are designed to address eight targeted areas including personal management, socialization skills, home and family management, vehicle safety, transportation, budgeting, employment and education. Upon acceptance into the program, often families have broken spirits. Self-esteem is at a low and it is hard for families to envision a brighter future. Many families may not understand the importance of getting along with others, managing a household, or having a transportation plan. Through the Family Promise Academy, families have the opportunity to learn life skills that will empower them to achieve long lasting self-sufficiency.
Going Home, Staying Home:
The Going Home, Staying Home program is designed to enable families to achieve and maintain sustainable lifestyles. Through the Going Home, Staying Home program families who have moved from the Interfaith Hospitality Network program into permanent housing are able to
continue to receive intensive case management services and are encouraged to continue participation in life skills workshops offered as part of the Family Promise Academy. Family Promise of Knoxville is committed to staying involved in the lives of graduate families for up to two years after they move into housing. Individual family needs and values dictate the case management plan that is developed; most often, this plan looks at maintaining housing, education and employment goals, developing a realistic budget, and crisis intervention.